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Crochet patterns are easy . . .

All Crochet Patterns are Easy | Yarn by Yarn Obsession

Crochet patterns are easy…

If you know all the stitches used in the pattern and you’ve run through the pattern before! How is pattern difficulty determined?

The first time I picked up an “intermediate” pattern and completed it with no problem, it was pure joy! At the time I still considered myself a “new” crocheter, but really wanted to make the piece so it didn’t matter. Following the euphoria, I realized something, all crochet patterns are easy if you know the stitches being used or you’re willing to learn. You don’t get from beginner to intermediate by constantly doing beginner patterns.

Most patterns list the stitches they’ll be using in the pattern. They also spell out the steps to complete a stitch if it’s a complicated set of stitches. If you’re confident you know the basic stitches being used in the pattern, then the level of difficulty is subjective to you. In the patterns I write I make sure to list the stitches you’re going to use so you can figure out if you need extra knowledge. Because most of my patterns are purchased online, I also couple the more difficult patterns with tutorial videos. If you’re like me, a video goes a long way to help you “see” how to create a stitch pattern. Many new crochet books are doing the same thing. They give basic crochet stitch instructions before moving forward with the pattern.

I’ll bet your question now is, “don’t you think any patterns are hard?” Yes, I do. If I find a stitch pattern I’ve never used before, it may take me a bit of catching up to understand and determine the positioning, sometimes that’s a really hard thing to decide to do. But once I’ve figured out the stitch, everything falls into place. What I want you to consider when buying a pattern is not so much how difficult they say the pattern is, but what stitches are being used and if you have a good understanding of them or not.

I also want my designers to be aware of these basics. If you’re using stitches in a complicated way, then your pattern may be more advanced and should be listed as such. But, if you’re using basic stitches in not so complicated ways, then keep the level at eye height. You don’t want to scare anyone away because they think your pattern is going to be too hard.

Here’s a short list of crochet stitches and their abbreviations from the Crochet Guild of America. Learning as many of these stitches as possible will make you a more confident crocheter and give you less anxiety when you come across a pattern that is labeled as one step above your perceived level of expertise. Remember, you’re as good a crocheter as you think you are, so go for it and try making those items you never thought you would, you may surprise yourself!

For a complete list of crochet abbreviations CLICK HERE: Crochet Abbreviations

Stitch Name (U.S.) Abbreviation Symbol Description
chain stitch ch Start with a loop on the hook. Hook yarn and pull through. (One chain completed.)
slip stitch sl st Insert hook into foundation chain or stitch, yarn over. Draw yarn through both the chain (or stitch) and the loop on the hook. (One slip stitch completed.)
single crochet sc Insert hook into foundation chain or stitch, yarn over and pull through chain or stitch (2 loops on hook). Yarn over and pull through both loops. (One single crochet stitch has been completed.)
half double crochet hdc Yarn over, insert hook into foundation chain or stitch, yarn over again and pull yarn through chain or stitch (3 loops on hook). Yarn over and pull through all 3 loops. (One half double crochet stitch has been completed.)
double crochet dc Yarn over, insert hook into foundation chain or stitch, yarn over again and pull yarn through chain or stitch (3 loops on hook). Yarn over and pull through 2 loops. Yarn over and pull through 2 loops again. (One double crochet has been completed.)
triple crochet tr Yarn over twice, insert hook into foundation chain or stitch, yarn over again and pull yarn through chain or stitch (4 loops on hook). Yarn over and pull through 2 loops. Yarn over and pull through 2 loops again. Yarn over and pull through the last 2 loops for a third time. (One triple crochet has been completed.)

I’d love to hear what level crocheter you think you are and how did you get there? Did you just jump in or did you wade slowly. 🙂


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Comments

  1. I agree completely!

  2. Barbara Cox says:

    Thank you for the chart of stitches!

“Hi! Just wanted to say that you did a GREAT job of explaining the HDC (half double crochet) edging for a single crochet blanket in your YouTube video. Thank you so much! God Bless” - Donna M.
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